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Auf die Schwierigkeit im Umgang mit dem Begriff. Roland Good of the University of Oregon worked to develop the assessment that Metzger uses. Keenen Ivory Wayans, star of the long-running satirical sketch comedy show In Living Colorwon an Emmy Award for his work in Between and Wilson chronicled Black American life in a series of 10 plays, one set in each decade of the 20th century. Within minutes of that assessment that information is available. What are some things that this child is doing because dash cam porn tube think this is the way you approach reading or the way you approach something but that's actually not the best way for them to do it? Delia Pompa: How can teachers fit all this in? And they will regularly solicit that opportunity to show what they have done, to show what they have accomplished. This Century Will See German sex slave tube Shifts in the Global Population, Economy, and Power Structure Vanessa Bates Ramirez July 16, Singularity Hub. You can use them as a guide to think about:. McKenna, what do these successful schools look like today?

Every minute that we spent assessing is a minute that we're not teaching. So by using a timed assessment we're able to in a very short period of time get high quality information.

In looking at the timing, we're also looking at the students' level of confidence with the skill. They may know the skill but they may not be confident with their knowledge and they may struggle their way through the skill and that's not mastery enough of the skill, that's really a sign that they're beginning to learn it but that they need additional practice.

All of the skills we're developing are skills that are a stepping stone to a higher level skill. If they're just barely able to do that skill but they're not confident with it, they're not prepared for the next step or the next level.

So we want them not only to master the skill but to be fluent and automatic with that skill so they can build additional skills on top of that one.

Coleman, how helpful are the standard assessment tools when it comes to children who have learning disabilities or other special needs?

What's the best way to get a fair picture of where those students stand? Mary Ruth Coleman: Well it's interesting that we started with the idea of time and we think about assessments from a timed perspective because when we think about children with learning disabilities or children that have other kinds of issues going on, we have to make sure that we're clear about time and power.

And are we looking at truly what the child knows and if we're trying to assess what the child knows, then we probably want to reduce even further the emphasis on time or how quickly they can do it.

But when we are looking at fluency issues or we're looking at other kinds of issues, then time comes back into the picture. So for students with disabilities, our first job is to minimize the impact of the area of disability on our assessments, to make sure that the abilities can shine through.

And then we need to be very, very clear what is the purpose of the assessment. Are we looking at fluency issues? Are we looking at issues that timing and specific precision in response are critical or can we allow for a draft process?

Can we allow a student — if we want to know if a student can write well, for example, then we want to mirror the writing process.

If we want to know if a student can understand written language, then we want to give them systematic ways to read and read with understanding.

Fluency's important. We need to know can they do this in a timed approach. Can they approach reading for content area? Because we want minimize the impact the area of disability, we want to make sure for example if we're looking at comprehension, is it important that we have comprehension just while reading, or do we also want to compare that to listening comprehension?

And if we find that a youngster has excellent listening comprehension but when they have to read on their own they can't read with their eyes and get that information, then we go back to why, what is the problem?

The problem is not thinking and understanding about the information, the problem is getting the information when I am reading on my own.

That can be fluency, that can be word recognition, that can be phonemic awareness, visual — a whole variety of things.

So targeted error analysis, what is the issue for this youngster is very important. That's a combination of using the kinds of assessments that we use to look at specific kinds of areas and then, as you said, systematically looking at where those strengths are and how we can pull that together to provide the support necessary for learning.

Delia Pompa: It's very clear from all of you it's not just about giving a test, it's knowing what you're looking for and how to do it.

Thanks everyone. Now we're going to take a look at Metzger Elementary School in Portland, Oregon. We'll begin in one of Ms. Pulver's first grade reading groups.

Announcer: At Metzger the first job is to divide the kids into flexible groups based on their reading level. That way they're challenged and also achieve some success everyday.

Pulver's students are working to catch up with their first grade peers. Announcer: For kids who struggle even in Ms. Pulver's group, teacher assistant Marilyn Peterson uses a much more basic curriculum with more opportunities to practice basic skills.

Announcer: For kids who are behind like JT Richardson, Metzger throws in an extra dose of reading with one-on-one tutoring while the rest of the class works on science or social studies.

JT gets to review the lesson for the day. This book is at a good level for JT, so the more he practices, the more comfortable he gets.

Being able to read fluidly and automatically is critical to comprehension. JT: Deena said let's bake cupcakes. Jack said I hate to bake.

Have you ever baked cupcakes, Jack asked Frank. Granddad can you help us. We bake…. Pulver: Wow! Oh my gosh! And you got in the word bake right at the time.

Pulver: Fifteen more words, high five, on the side, down low, way to go, JT. Announcer: JT charts his progress everyday but while they continue to give him positive feedback, his teachers are concerned.

Pulver: He's a concern because there's a marginal growth but it's just totally not consistent. Announcer: Every three months Metzger's school district comes in to do its own assessment of each child.

That's in addition to the weekly or bi-weekly assessments that the school does. Pam Zinn: JT is a student that I would be concerned about.

It's the end of first grade, he still needs to sound all of his words out. He has a few words memorized, the basic sight words, but he still has a ways to go there.

Announcer: Dr. Roland Good of the University of Oregon worked to develop the assessment that Metzger uses. Good: His progress is telling us that we have not yet found the level of support that he needs and the child is always right.

The child is telling you I'm not getting enough support. They're right and then we need to find a way to provide more support to him.

The truth is we have the knowledge, we have the skills, we have the intervention to teach these skills to an extremely broad range of children.

And we should not accept a reason why we are not teaching them. We should make sure that we teach them. Delia Pompa: You're very convincing Dr.

What do you mean when you say the child is always right? Good: Well the teachers at Metzger are really starting with the belief that, the conviction, the position that we need to teach all of our children to read, all of our children each one, to read at an adequate level of proficiency, anything less than that has too dire of consequences for that child and for their life.

And so they're looking at the progress of that child week by week and they're saying is their progress adequate to reach these important literacy goals?

And when the child's progress is not adequate, that's saying to us we need to provide more support. If we want all children to reach the same goals, we have to provide more support to some children than we do to others.

We have to make that decision and the child's progress is what tells us how much support do we need to provide. When their progress is less then adequate, they're telling us we need to do more.

It's our job to figure out what that more would be, what kind of support it would be. Is that extra time, is that extra practice, is that a modified curriculum that's going to target essential skills?

We have to solve that and figure out what it would take to get the child to where they need to get to. Delia Pompa: Well what are some of the reasons schools give for not teaching some kids to read and does good assessment help?

Good: Oh, good assessment is essential. You know, I think probably one of the biggest misconceptions about why some children are not making adequate progress is a belief that time is the answer.

That if we wait for them to mature adequately, they will become ready and they will be readers. The evidence shows that that probably won't work, the odds are very against that approach.

We need to, when a child is not making adequate progress, do something about it. It's our instruction that will change the trajectory and the pathway for that child.

Delia Pompa: I think a lot of teachers find the concept of assessment driven instruction challenging to deal with in the classroom.

Can you give us an example of what it would look like? Good: Well in order for this to be workable for teachers in a classroom, it must be efficient and it must be purposeful.

By efficient, I mean, we should get the maximum amount of information in the smallest amount of time because every minute we spend testing is a minute that we're not teaching.

And our primary purpose is to teach. If we find ourselves spending all of our time testing — and I've been in schools where the first six weeks of the school year is spent in testing.

This is out of control because our primary job is to teach and it must be purposeful. When we're assessing, we're assessing for a purpose, to make a decision.

A decision that will change the outcome for the student. So assessment needs to be linked to and tied to a decision-making model.

If I'm testing, I'm testing for a reason. That reason will allow me to make a decision about that child, where are they, where do they need to be?

Is their progress adequate? Do I need to provide more support? Do I need to maintain the support that I'm providing? How is our system working?

All of those are decisions that we need to inform with assessment. By making those decisions well with reliable and valid measures we can improve outcomes for our children.

Delia Pompa: Well what are some of the challenges a teacher's going to run into using assessment guided instruction and how can she handle them?

Good: Well you know I think that there are two biggest challenges that I think teachers encounter.

Powerful, valid, reliable, important assessment provides very vivid information to the teacher of which children are on track and which children need more support.

One of the very first questions that a teacher will say, after they receive this powerful assessment information is, what should I do about it.

And we need to have interventions that are linked to those important ideas that a teacher can bring to bury right away when they see that a-that a-a-a student is struggling.

Probably the second question that comes up is when we're providing our best intervention and we're looking at the student's progress, and if we see that that progress is not at the rate that we want them to be progressing, and the student at Metzger is an example of that, then the question becomes what should we change about what we're doing.

And this is also a very difficult question for teachers. They know how to teach, they have powerful instruction, but if that's not working, what do I do differently.

And the answer, I think, to both of those is around professional development. And we really have very powerful answers to those questions.

We need to get those answers to teachers, we need to get those resources to teachers. So the professional development and coaching for those teachers are essential resources for implementing data-based instruction.

Delia Pompa: The struggling readers seem to be the biggest challenge for some teachers. Why is it so important to check up on them regularly, these struggling readers, and even weekly sometimes?

Good: You know, I think there's two reasons for that. A very first reason is as teachers we don't do very well in judging a student's progress. We do very well judging that a student is at risk, but judging progress is much more difficult.

If we're teaching as hard as we can, we tend to think that they're making adequate progress. Sometimes they're not.

That assessment is essential to tell us when a student is not making adequate progress to tell us that we need to do something different. The research has shown very persuasively that when we're monitoring progress in changing what we do when we have to, that we can improve outcomes dramatically.

So one reason to monitor progress frequently is to improve student outcomes. I think there's a second benefit of that progress monitoring as well.

That when we are a teacher or when we're a student — and students and teachers know when they're a struggling reader or if I'm a struggling reader.

We know that. And this is very discouraging. And if you can see yourself making progress toward an important goal, it is hugely motivating, it's hugely invigorating to the teacher as well as to the student, and it can redouble effort, it can get the bought in when other things would be a tendency for them to buy out.

Delia Pompa: Well, what about our stronger students? What kinds of check ups should we be giving them? Good: We absolutely need to check up on our stronger students.

Probably not as often but we need to check up on them as well. In part because we as a school are responsible for all of our children.

We need to make sure all of our students, our high students, our middle students, our low students, we need to make sure everybody is progressing, everybody is benefiting from our instructions.

So we need to check up and make sure that by focusing on struggling readers we're not detracting from the progress of our advanced readers.

We also need to check up on those advanced readers to make sure that we're not missing some essential, crucial foundation skill.

Some of these students will pick up on reading quickly. Informally they'll have their own understanding of it that will look fine in the short term.

But they may be missing essential skills that place them at risk when we move into more advanced reading skills, especially when we move into multi-syllabic words or a broader reading vocabulary.

We need other strategies to be able to encounter that. If we're missing a key foundation, those students become at risk later on even though they look great at the beginning.

Delia Pompa: That sounds like a very complex set of tasks for the teacher. How can technology help make assessments easier? Good: Well, there's two aspects of technology.

One aspect of the technology is our knowledge about testing, our knowledge about interventions. And we know how to do this. We have solved the technology issues about how to test and how to intervene.

The other aspect of technology is really, you know, like computers and gizmos and stuff. And we're doing some remarkable things with computers and with hand-held and palm devices where a teacher can sit there with a palm, call up an individual student.

On the palm an assessment probe will be present. They'll do the assessment with the student in a matter of minutes and record what the student says on the palm device, synchronize it to a database that can provide reports to the teacher, to the principal, to the superintendent showing the progress of all the students in the school.

Within minutes of that assessment that information is available. The teacher can then pull it up on a webpage and there's analysis software that will look at the item responses of the student and suggest appropriate targets for instruction and even suggest appropriate interventions that would work for that.

McKenna, what are the benefits of so-called high stakes reading tests or tests for reading and what are the dangers?

McKenna: It's a tough call but there are legitimate needs of various stakeholders, parents, policymakers, legislatures and so forth, to identify exactly how effective our reading instructional efforts are.

And that was really the reason for instituting and requiring these tests in the first place, partly associated with No Child Left Behind but these, of course, have a much longer history than that.

Honey bees collect nectar and pollen from flowers. The labrum is a short, wide flap that partially covers the other mouthparts and serves as a front lip.

Mandibles are generalized grasping tools used for gathering pollen, handling wax, and grooming. The maxillae and labium interlock to form a hinged proboscis that can be extended from beneath the head to lap up nectar.

The central-most part of the proboscis is a tongue-like structure containing the salivary canal. It is derived from the fused glossae of the labium.

Long labial palps on the anterior side of the glossae are sensory in function. The galea of the maxillae flank the labium on each side, overlapping behind to form a channel through which nectar passes to the mouth.

The lacinia is vestigal and the maxillary palp is very small, but the rod-shaped cardo and oblong stipes are easy to find. The mouthparts of house flies and blow flies are specialized for sponging up liquid food.

The labium has large lobes labellae with sclerotized grooves pseudotracheae on the under surface.

During feeding, liquid food collects in these grooves and moves upward by capillary action until it can be sucked into the food canal on the backside of the labrum.

The hypopharynx is hollow and surrounds the salivary canal. A pair of large, hairy maxillary palps are usually present on the upper part of the proboscis.

When a fly lands on solid food, it may regurgitate a droplet containing digestive enzymes and then sponge up the residue moments later.

Yum yum! The mouthparts of a female mosquito are highly modified to form a proboscis that is adapted for piercing skin and sucking blood.

Males have similar mouthparts, but they feed only on nectar. The proboscis is similar to a sword within a scabbard. The stylets include two mandibles, two maxillae, the labrum, and the hypopharnyx.

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